Tag Archives: Value-Added Modeling

Court Rules Against Flawed VAM Model

A Texas court has ruled against the use of value-added modeling in teacher evaluation saying the system used violates due process. Texas now joins New York as states where courts have found value-added systems used for teacher evaluation simply don’t stand up to scrutiny. Here’s more on the Texas case: Judge Stephen Smith of the […]

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Hawaii Cans VAM

Last week, the Hawaii Board of Education decided to move away from the use of student growth scores (value-added modeling, or VAM) in teacher evaluations. From the press release announcing the change: The significant changes to Policy 203.4, Teacher Performance Evaluation, are: •Remove student test scores as a required measure of student learning and growth; […]

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Connecticut Should Heed VAM Warning

Sarah Darer Littman writes of the recent Lederman decision on value-added modeling and warns Connecticut policymakers to take heed. Specifically, Littman notes: Justice Roger D. McDonough of the N.Y. Supreme Court’s 3rd District provided a reminder of this on Tuesday when he ruled in the case of Sheri G. Lederman that the N.Y. Education Department’s […]

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A New Director and some VAM Bias

Last week, Metro Nashville Public Schools hired a new Director, Shawn Joseph. Also, some careful analysis of a recent study by the Tennessee Department of Education on “effective teaching” reveals some bias in the way the state’s value-added scores are distributed. Specifically: The study used TVAAS scores alone to determine a student’s access to “effective […]

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VAM: Correct Diagnosis, Wrong Prescription

In his recent article in Education Post, Arthur Levine laments the limits of current Value-Added Modeling (VAM) while proposing a move to a “new” VAM or VAM 2.0. To his credit, he correctly points out some significant limitations of VAM in determining teacher effectiveness, but the solutions he proposes move in the wrong direction. Here […]

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VAM: “Arbitrary” and “Capricious”

Those are the words from a New York judge in the case of a teacher who sued over her evaluation scores — scores based on value-added modeling, or VAM. While VAM has come under scrutiny from educators and academics as a suspect means of providing teacher evaluation scores, this case marks a turning point as […]

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The Absurdity of VAM

Donna Krache offers a very brief explanation of why using value-added modeling (VAM) as the key means of determining teacher effectiveness is seriously flawed: The VAM system in New York also presents content challenges. Since the state’s tests are given only in math and English Language Arts, and since all teachers must be evaluated in part […]

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Unreliable and Invalid

Testing experts have for years now been warning school reformers that efforts to evaluate teachers using VAM are not reliable or valid. This from yet another story about problems with value-added modeling, or VAM. The story details the case of a New York teacher who is suing the state because evaluation results there, based on […]

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Some Inconvenient Facts about VAM

Stuart Yeh at the University of Minnesota does some analysis of the existing literature on value-added modeling and its use in high stakes decisions around teachers. What he finds is that VAM is unreliable and not valid for use in high stakes decisions like hiring/firing and assigning pay. Here are some highlights: “Results indicate that […]

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Principals’ Group Challenges VAM for Evaluations

The National Association of Secondary School Principals is out with a statement that criticizes the use of value-added data to evaluate teachers, and specifically, use of such data in “key personnel decisions.” The news comes courtesy of Stephen Sawchuk at Education Week. The group is preparing to formally adopt a statement that says, in part: […]

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