Archive | Testing RSS feed for this section

A Gap in Analysis

From Tennessee Education Report: Here’s the bottom line: Income gaps explain achievement gaps. That is, states with relatively large income gaps tend to have relatively large achievement gaps. Likewise, states with more income homogeneity tend to have smaller achievement gaps. I wrote about this on a Tennessee-specific level when talking about the achievement gap and […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Of TNReady and Craigslist

From WSMV: Some Tennessee teachers and parents are concerned about posts on Craigslist that appear to be recruiting people to grade achievement tests in other states. The company is the same one that developed TN Ready, but education officials claim Craigslist recruiting isn’t something happening here. On Craigslist, there are listings for bikes, boats, tickets, […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

TNReady or Not

Tennessee’s move to a new, online assessment encountered problems on Day One as students across the state were unable to access the delivery platform. Here’s more on the challenges experienced in Tennessee: It’s campaign season and candidate after candidate is telling voters they are the clear choice because they will be “ready on day one.” […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Abusive Testing: Why One Teacher Resigned

Jo Lieb posted this letter on her blog last week. It’s from a teacher in Florida who resigned her position due to the abusive practice of over-testing. Among other things, the writer notes that the culture of testing is detrimental to especially younger kids and that in spite of a push for more tests, schools […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

A Testing Epidemic

That’s what the 2015 National Superintendent of the Year says about the current climate in our schools — that we’re facing a testing epidemic. Philip Lanoue, Superintendent of Clarke County Schools in Georgia, has this to say about what America’s schools are facing: It is clear that the annual testing merry-go-round is not going to […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Pssst… Poverty Matters

That’s what a new survey from Communities in Schools not so surprisingly reveals. Here are some key findings: According to CIS, the impact of poverty is so great that teachers often find themselves helping students address non-educational issues, and have spent their own money on supplies (91%), used their own money to help feed students […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Toward Project-Based Learning

One elementary school in Lexington is using Project-Based Learning to turnaround its performance. An article detailing the approach also notes it is a multi-year commitment focused on success, not immediate results. I previously wrote about Danville’s use of PBL as a hopeful experiment and an interesting reconnection to Kentucky’s KERA reforms of the 1990s. Now, it seems […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Toward Grade-Span Testing

An editorial in the Charlotte Observer recently highlighted the possibility of a return to grade-span testing in schools. This would replace the annual testing that has become the driver of much recent “education reform.” The proposal is part of a the NCLB rewrite that is ongoing — a reauthorization failed to win enough support in […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Of Testing and Poverty

A Kentucky teacher shares her story about poverty and testing: I became involved in education activism after starting my first year at Lassiter.  Going into the position (after seeing their KPREP scores – oh my!), I thought “great, I’ll stay here one year and get the heck out as soon as I can apply for […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →