Archive by Author

Why Collaboration is Important in Teacher Compensation Plans

First, it seems fairly obvious that in devising new pay plans for teachers, teachers ought to be consulted about what would work for them. What is it they are looking for in a pay plan?  But, many states (like Tennessee and North Carolina, for example) proceed without getting input from the teachers who are impacted […]

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Kentucky and the Common Core

I’ve written recently over at Kentucky Education Report about Kentucky’s Common Core experience. First, I wrote about Gov. Steve Beshear and Commissioner Terry Holliday defending the Common Core from common attacks. More recently, I’ve written about the early implementation experience in Kentucky.  While there have certainly been some bumps in the road, Kentucky is further along […]

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Ravitch Cites Spears on Value-Added

Education historian and author Diane Ravitch cited an article I wrote for Tennessee Education Report on the lack of evidence that value-added data helps improve education outcomes. I’ve written on this topic several times, including noting the shortcomings of value-added data and the inability of value-added data to effectively differentiate among teachers. For more on education […]

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The Pitfalls of Value-Added Data

A version of this post first appeared in Tennessee Education Report. Valerie Strauss has an interesting piece over at the Washington Post dealing with Value-Added Modeling.  More specifically, the post analyzes what can be learned from 20 years of the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System (TVAAS) implemented as a result of the Education Improvement Act — the […]

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What can we really learn from Value-Added Modeling?

This post first appeared in Kentucky Education Report   Lots of attention in the discussion around teacher quality focuses on value-added data and the ability to determine a teacher’s effectiveness from a single test score. More recently, a study by researchers at Harvard has received lots of attention because it purports to indicate that replacing […]

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School Funding in the States: What is BEP 2.0?

This article first appeared in Tennessee Education Report I’ve written before about the importance of fixing Tennessee’s school funding formula (the BEP) and doing so by fully-funding BEP 2.0. But, what is BEP 2.0? And what would it mean if fully-funded? Well, here’s Governor Bredesen’s 2007 speech outlining the BEP 2.0 changes (developed with then […]

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It takes a community …

A lot of the talk in education reform focuses on teacher quality as the key factor to influence in order to impact student achievement.  While teacher quality is important, and other school-based factors also play a role, it is also important to realize that 50% of the factors that determine whether or not a child […]

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Charters, Testing, and Teacher Licenses

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been focusing my education policy writing over at Tennessee Education Report. I’ve written about what Rand Paul and Lamar Alexander got wrong about education in Kentucky and Tennessee. Tennessee has a lot to learn from what Kentucky’s gotten right.  Even as Stu Silberman reminds us that Kentucky MUST keep […]

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What Tennessee Can Learn from Kentucky

So, yesterday’s event in Nashville featuring Sen. Lamar Alexander and Sen. Rand Paul got me thinking about the two states, education policy, and how Tennessee still has a lot to learn.  I wrote more about it here.

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Tennessee Education Policy

Since January of this year, I’ve been writing about Education Policy in Tennessee over at Tennessee Education Report. Here, I offer a summary of those writings as they make up a foundation for understanding the current education policy climate in Tennessee. First, a little bit about the Common Core.  Unfortunately, these standards have become somewhat […]

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